Employment

Employers Struggle to Retain and Recruit for Management Positions

 

Interesting article from Training Journal:

“A company that does not work hard to retain its employees and invest in its people will find itself in a difficult situation given we already have a shortage of high quality managers. Strong managers are the lifeblood of effective organisations and too many employers are realising this too late.”

http://www.trainingjournal.com/news/articles-news-employers-struggle-to-retain-and-recruit-for-management-roles-survey-reveals/ (Accessed 23/04/2012).

 

Advertisements

World Youth Report puts Focus on Skills

“Some of the views in the report point directly to the kinds of policy questions that are preoccupying governments – and employers – eager to match skilled jobs with skilled workers.

According to the young people cited in the report:

  • public and private employers need to collaborate more effectively with educational institutions;
  • vocational training needs to be made more available and accessible;
  • employers need to value vocational training, apprenticeships and non-formal training more highly;
  • labour market needs should be analysed continuously and extensively;
  • education and training programmes should be tailored to labour market needs.”

The above links closely to the New South African Post-Secondary Education Green Paper. However, in my view not all education programmes should be tailored to labour market needs – we should avoid commodification and flattening of all Higher Education to a labour market technicist paradigm.

http://efareport.wordpress.com/2012/02/10/world-youth-report-puts-focus-on-skills/ (accessed 21/03/2012)

What do you think?

Knowledge and skills are infinite – oil is not

English: OECD Logo Deutsch: OECD Logo

Image via Wikipedia

From OECD and by  Andreas Schleicher: this excerpt below reflects what I have just posted about our skills crisis and the reworking of our post-secondary education – Published in the Green Paper recently. It also reflects the article by Thomas Friedman posted a few days ago.

“…Moreover, this new ‘currency’ depreciates as skill requirements of labor-markets evolve and individuals lose the skills they do not use. The toxic coexistence of high unemployment and skill shortages in many countries today illustrates that producing more of the same graduates is not the answer. To succeed with converting knowledge and skills into jobs, growth and social outcomes which nations require, we need to develop a better understanding of those skills that drive strong and sustainable economic and social outcomes; we need to ensure that the right mix of skills is being taught and learned over the lifecycle of people; we need to develop effective labor-markets that use their skill potential; and we need better governance arrangements with sustainable approaches to who should pay for what, when and where. OECD’s new Skills Strategy is now providing a framework to support countries with building, maintaining and using their human capital to boost employment and growth and promote social inclusion.”

http://oecdeducationtoday.blogspot.co.uk/2012/03/knowledge-and-skills-are-infinite-oil.html (accessed 19/03/2012). Please view to see the whole article.

28 January 2012

It is important that learning on work experience placement is understood

‘Eames and Cates (2011: 41) point out that there is a scarcity of research concerning cooperative and work-integrated education about “the educational outcomes from, and processes in, work placements”; as well as “understanding about learning in the work placement”. They argue (p. 42) that “understanding how learning occurs” during work-integrated learning placements would help legitimise workplace experience as legitimate aspect of cooperative programmes as educative. There is way too much emphasis on employer ratings and student papers concerning their work-integrated learning placements “in order to award credit”. Too little effort is devoted to “finding out what the students are really learning” from workplace experiences—“credit is not simply given for work experience” but should be given for the “learning [that is] resulting from work experience”. Eames and Cates (2011: 42) therefore consider it important that learning on “work experience [placement] is understood” in order “that appropriate curricula, pedagogy, and assessment can be designed and implemented”.

Eames and Cates (2011: 41) remark that research and development has mainly been pragmatically applied-descriptive and evaluative—what constitutes the successful operation; the outcomes of work placements; career clarification for students; enabling recruitment of candidates perceived suitable; collaboration with work-integrated learning hosts; completion of study-related projects; and attraction of students to programmes.’

Eames, C. & Cates, C. 2011. Theories of learning in cooperative and work-integrated education (pp. 41-52). In R.K. Coll & K.E. Zegwaard (Eds.). International handbook for cooperative and work-integrated education (2nd ed.). World Association for Cooperative Education Inc.

Download EamesC+CatesC_Theories_of_learning_in_cooperative+work-integrated_Education

From: http://psychsoma.co.za/learning_in_vivo/workintegrated_learning/ (accessed 16/03/2012)

Learning for Jobs

“In OECD countries, many young people enter vocational programmes at upper secondary level. Sometimes these programmes are linked to workplace training, and sometimes they are formal apprenticeships, alternating on-the-job learning with school-based training.   Despite its international diversity, some common issues and challenges remain. For example:

  • how to balance the needs of students and employers in the provision of training;
  • the skills required by VET teachers and trainers;
  • the extent to which the benefits of workplace training can be fully exploited;
  • the most effective models for engaging employers and unions;
  • how better measures of labour market outcomes can be developed, and compared across countries.

Learning for Jobs, the thematic review of initial VET, looks at these issues among others. The work got under way in 2007 and, following 17 country reviews across the globe, was completed with the publication of a final comparative report in 2010.”

http://www.oecd.org/edu/learningforjobs

See here ready to work videos covering time management, listening skills etc., from on the job TV.

http://onthejobtv.org/site/category/readytowork/