Learning Theories

Teachers Easy Guide to Social Learning

 

See on Scoop.itskills services

“For learning to be successful it has to have a social ingredient in it. This social ingredient requires observation, attention and interaction. Students tend to learn better when they use their observational skills attentively. Thankfully, the new emerging technology provides these requirements and the onus is on the teacher to show students how to use and leverage such technology in their learning.”

See on www.educatorstechnology.com

 

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What’s the Learning in 21st Century Learning?

Article by Norm Friesen – Canada Research Chair e-learning Practices at http://learningspaces.org/node/86 from Christopher Pappas – The e-learning Industry: http://paper.li/cpappas/1289823372

“Preparing an abstract for a presentation at SFU’s Ed. Summer Institute, and have been inspired by Diskurse des Lernens (Discourses of Learning) by Käte Mayer-Drawe. Here’s my translation of a page from the introduction:

Learning begins… where and when that which is familiar loses its utility and that which is new is not yet useful: “when the old world is, so to say, abandoned, and a new one does not yet exist” (Mead). Its path leads not from shadows to the light; instead it brings one into the twilight, at a threshold between no longer and not yet. From a pedagogical perspective and in the strictest sense, learning is an experience. This is the central thesis of this book. As simple as this may sound, its implications are both subversive and anachronistic. Disruptions, difficulties and other inadequacies are unpopular…a pedagogical theory of learning that focuses on inefficient uncertainties can have particular meaning.”

Evaluating Learning in the Workplace

Evaluating learning – article from Personnel Today

“Richard Paul Griffin, associate director at the Institute of Vocational Education at London South Bank University, presents a new way of approaching evaluation based on a review of how organisations currently evaluate learning in Workplace learning evaluation: a conceptual model and framework (registration required).

His model of workplace learning is based on five elements: a pre-learning stage; the “trigger” (need) for learning; the learning event; application of learning; and the impact of learning.

His aim is to provide what he calls a “scientifically robust but practitioner-friendly framework for workplace learning evaluation”.

Griffin’s approach may provide some new focus on the best ways evaluate the impact of learning interventions.”

Image from Training Assessment Education: http://www.logicoolsolutions.com/learnDoMasterChallenge/?p=1305 (Accessed 28/04/2012).

http://www.personneltoday.com/articles/2012/04/23/58483/measuring-the-impact-of-learning-quick-fire-links.html (Accessed 28/04/2012).

This framework in my view is very useful. Check out the model here:

http://lsbu.academia.edu/RichardGriffin/Papers/1003499/Workplace_learning_evaluation