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Teachers Easy Guide to Social Learning

 

See on Scoop.itskills services

“For learning to be successful it has to have a social ingredient in it. This social ingredient requires observation, attention and interaction. Students tend to learn better when they use their observational skills attentively. Thankfully, the new emerging technology provides these requirements and the onus is on the teacher to show students how to use and leverage such technology in their learning.”

See on www.educatorstechnology.com

 

What I’ve Learned About Learning

From Zen Habits – Breathe – http://zenhabits.net/learn/ To read more follow the link.

‘We learn more by looking for the answer to a question and not finding it than we do from learning the answer itself.’ ~Lloyd Alexander.

Post written by Leo Babauta.

“I am a teacher and an avid learner, and I’m passionate about both.

I’m a teacher because I help Eva homeschool our kids — OK, she does most of the work, but I do help, mostly with math but with everything else too. I also teach habits, writing/blogging, simplicity and other fun topics in online courses.

I’m a lifelong learner and am always obsessively studying something, whether that’s breadmaking or language or wine or chess or writing or fitness.

Here’s are two key lessons — both really the same lesson — I’ve learned about learning, in all my years of study and in trying to teach people:

  1. Almost everything I’ve learned, I didn’t learn in school; and
  2. Almost everything my students (and kids) have learned, they learned on their own.

Those two lessons (or one lesson) have a number of reasons and implications for learning. Let’s take a look at some of them, in hopes you might find them useful.”

 

Related Articles

What’s the Learning in 21st Century Learning?

Article by Norm Friesen – Canada Research Chair e-learning Practices at http://learningspaces.org/node/86 from Christopher Pappas – The e-learning Industry: http://paper.li/cpappas/1289823372

“Preparing an abstract for a presentation at SFU’s Ed. Summer Institute, and have been inspired by Diskurse des Lernens (Discourses of Learning) by Käte Mayer-Drawe. Here’s my translation of a page from the introduction:

Learning begins… where and when that which is familiar loses its utility and that which is new is not yet useful: “when the old world is, so to say, abandoned, and a new one does not yet exist” (Mead). Its path leads not from shadows to the light; instead it brings one into the twilight, at a threshold between no longer and not yet. From a pedagogical perspective and in the strictest sense, learning is an experience. This is the central thesis of this book. As simple as this may sound, its implications are both subversive and anachronistic. Disruptions, difficulties and other inadequacies are unpopular…a pedagogical theory of learning that focuses on inefficient uncertainties can have particular meaning.”

12 Dozen places to educate yourself online for free

Lists from Marc and Angel Hack Life – thanks to them for extensive lists – follow the link to see the lists:

“All education is self-education.  Period.  It doesn’t matter if you’re sitting in a college classroom or a coffee shop.  We don’t learn anything we don’t want to learn.

Those people who take the time and initiative to pursue knowledge on their own are the only ones who earn a real education in this world.  Take a look at any widely acclaimed scholar, entrepreneur or historical figure you can think of.  Formal education or not, you’ll find that he or she is a product of continuous self-education.

If you’re interested in learning something new, this article is for you.  Broken down by subject and/or category, here are several top-notch self-education resources I have bookmarked online over the past few years.”

Image below and content from this link: http://www.marcandangel.com/2010/11/15/12-dozen-places-to-self-educate-yourself-online/

Evaluating Learning in the Workplace

Evaluating learning – article from Personnel Today

“Richard Paul Griffin, associate director at the Institute of Vocational Education at London South Bank University, presents a new way of approaching evaluation based on a review of how organisations currently evaluate learning in Workplace learning evaluation: a conceptual model and framework (registration required).

His model of workplace learning is based on five elements: a pre-learning stage; the “trigger” (need) for learning; the learning event; application of learning; and the impact of learning.

His aim is to provide what he calls a “scientifically robust but practitioner-friendly framework for workplace learning evaluation”.

Griffin’s approach may provide some new focus on the best ways evaluate the impact of learning interventions.”

Image from Training Assessment Education: http://www.logicoolsolutions.com/learnDoMasterChallenge/?p=1305 (Accessed 28/04/2012).

http://www.personneltoday.com/articles/2012/04/23/58483/measuring-the-impact-of-learning-quick-fire-links.html (Accessed 28/04/2012).

This framework in my view is very useful. Check out the model here:

http://lsbu.academia.edu/RichardGriffin/Papers/1003499/Workplace_learning_evaluation

OECD – Human Capital Learning for Life

From OECD Insights (image at link reference), valid and useful insights: http://www.oecd.org/document/56/0,3746,en_21571361_37705603_37781352_1_1_1_1,00.html

“Populations in many societies are ageing, meaning that in future there will be fewer people of working age to support growing numbers of retirees. The result is that more of us will need to go on working for longer. To do that societies will need to break down the barriers that prevent adults from updating their skills and education.

Chapter 5 of Learning for Life looks at adult learning, and finds out who’s getting it and who isn’t. It examines the barriers that prevent adults from developing their skills and knowledge. And it looks at what individuals, employers and governments can do to tear down those barriers.”

Top 100 Learning Organizations Named in Second Annual Awards Program

Elearning! Media Group (EMG), publishers of Elearning! and Government Elearning! magazines, announced today the Learning! 100 Award recipients. The Learning! 100 Award recognizes 60 corporate and 40 public sector organizations for outstanding learning culture, innovation or collaboration that drives performance. Honorees cut across all industries and organization sizes, from 5 to 1.6 million employees.” See link below:

http://www.prweb.com/releases/2012/3/prweb9314565.htm

28 January 2012

It is important that learning on work experience placement is understood

‘Eames and Cates (2011: 41) point out that there is a scarcity of research concerning cooperative and work-integrated education about “the educational outcomes from, and processes in, work placements”; as well as “understanding about learning in the work placement”. They argue (p. 42) that “understanding how learning occurs” during work-integrated learning placements would help legitimise workplace experience as legitimate aspect of cooperative programmes as educative. There is way too much emphasis on employer ratings and student papers concerning their work-integrated learning placements “in order to award credit”. Too little effort is devoted to “finding out what the students are really learning” from workplace experiences—“credit is not simply given for work experience” but should be given for the “learning [that is] resulting from work experience”. Eames and Cates (2011: 42) therefore consider it important that learning on “work experience [placement] is understood” in order “that appropriate curricula, pedagogy, and assessment can be designed and implemented”.

Eames and Cates (2011: 41) remark that research and development has mainly been pragmatically applied-descriptive and evaluative—what constitutes the successful operation; the outcomes of work placements; career clarification for students; enabling recruitment of candidates perceived suitable; collaboration with work-integrated learning hosts; completion of study-related projects; and attraction of students to programmes.’

Eames, C. & Cates, C. 2011. Theories of learning in cooperative and work-integrated education (pp. 41-52). In R.K. Coll & K.E. Zegwaard (Eds.). International handbook for cooperative and work-integrated education (2nd ed.). World Association for Cooperative Education Inc.

Download EamesC+CatesC_Theories_of_learning_in_cooperative+work-integrated_Education

From: http://psychsoma.co.za/learning_in_vivo/workintegrated_learning/ (accessed 16/03/2012)